Posted on 11/20/2012 at 12:55 PM by Global Reach

Is College and Career Ready the Same Thing?
ACHIEVE:  American Diploma Project Network - dpi.wi.gov/oea/pdf/ccready.pdf

With respect to the knowledge and skills in English and mathematics expected by employers and postsecondary faculty, the answer is yes.  In the last decade, research conducted by Achieve as well as others shows a convergence in the expectations of employers and colleges in terms of the knowledge and skills high school grads need to be successful after high school.  Economic reality reflects these converging expectations.  Education is more valued and more necessary that ever before.  The bottom line is that today ALL high school graduates need to be prepared for some postsecondary education and/or training if they are to have options and opportunities in the job market.
•    Thirty five years ago, only 12% of U.S. jobs required some postsecondary training or an associate’s degree and only 16% required a bachelor’s degree or higher.
•    Nearly eight in ten future job openings in the next decade in the U.S. will require postsecondary education or training. Forty-five percent will be in “middle skill” occupations, which require at least some postsecondary education and training, while 33% will be in high skilled occupations for which a Bachelors degree or more is required.
•    While the U.S. still ranks 3rd in the adult population (25-64 year olds) with an associates degree or higher among 30 countries, we now rank 10th among 25-34 year olds with a two-year degree and above. Competing countries are catching up to – and even outpacing – the U.S. in the educational attainment of their new generation of adults.
•    Higher levels of education lead to elevated wages, a more equitable distribution of income and substantial gains in productivity. For every additional average year of schooling U.S. citizens complete, the GDP would increase by about 0.37 percentage points – or by 10% – over time.

What do these statistics mean for our students?  How can we communicate these statistics to our parents and students so they can be better prepared?

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